LEBANON

INTERSOS INTERVENTION

We began our intervention in Lebanon in 2006, bringing aid to the people in the south of the country during the conflict with Israel, and supporting communities in the peace process after the initial emergency passed. We returned to the country in 2013 to respond to the humanitarian crisis triggered by the Syrian conflict, supporting both Syrian refugees and the most vulnerable Lebanese. We gradually extended our intervention to cover the regions of the Bekaa, Mount Lebanon and the south of the country. We provide Syrian refugees with housing and health care, supplying drinking water and sanitation, and we promote activities to foster the integration process of refugees in local communities. 70% of our interventions in Lebanon are protection projects, and INTERSOS is recognized as one of the main actors in the field of protection activities in the country, aimed at minors and combating gender-based violence, with psychological and psychosocial support, legal assistance and informal training. These activities are carried out also thanks to the many community centres and safe spaces for women and children managed by INTERSOS. Other projects to provide economic support to the refugees are conducted in the Bekaa, along with nutrition initiatives and interventions focused on water and sanitation in the Bekaa and the south of the country.

HIGHLIGHTS

58.787

RECIPIENTS OF VOUCHERS OR FOOD PACKAGES (2016)

520

MINORS WITH ACCESS TO QUALITY PRIMARY EDUCATION (2016)

19

COMMUNITY CENTER (2016)

14.442

PEOPLE ASSISTED IN THE COMMUNITY CENTER (2016)

2.795

MINORS VICTIMS OF VIOLENCE OR AT RISK IDENTIFIED AND ASSISTED (2016)

16.540

PEOPLE REACHED BY DRINKING WATER (2016)

989

LATRINES BUILT (2016)

CONTEXT

Because of the ongoing Syrian crisis, Lebanon now hosts more than 1 million Syrian refugees who live in poor sanitary conditions and very precarious housing conditions. Syrian refugees account for about 25% of Lebanon’s total population, and the shortage of economic and work resources in the country threatens the very survival of people. It also causes deep tensions between refugees and the local population (according to a study by the World Bank and the Lebanese National Centre of Statistics, 1 Lebanese out of 4 lives in poverty). This exposes the people fleeing the conflict to the risk of abuse and violence, especially the most vulnerable groups. The current social protection system, already inadequate to provide specific services to victims of gender-based violence, is unable to handle the massive influx of refugees. About a third of Syrian refugees in Lebanon do not have a job, while most of them who find a job are faced with difficult working conditions and inadequate wages.

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