Jordan | INTERSOS

JORDAN

INTERSOS’ INTERVENTION

In 2020, INTERSOS in Jordan implemented activities in the sectors of protection, education and WASH. Support was offered to the survivors of gender-based violence, people at risk of GBV, and a tailored support to LBGTQI+ people. Vulnerable people, refugees or Jordanians, living outside the refugee camps (also in the hard to reach rural areas) have been identified and offered specialised psychosocial support (individually and in groups); legal counselling and emergency economic assistance. Moreover, INTERSOS increased WASH activities for people living in informal settlements, through the rehabilitation of infrastructure and the installation of water tanks and mobile latrines. Finally, in the education sector, INTERSOS has helped out-ofschool children to re-enter formal education or certified non-formal education.

We work in Jordan since 2012.

 

Data 2020*

HIGHLIGHTS*

30,300

PEOPLE REACHED

13

PROJECTS IMPLEMENTED

2,056,094.06 €

BUDGET SPENT

SECTORS OF INTERVENTION

PROTECTION

WATER, SANITATION AND HYGIENE (WASH)
HEALTH AND NUTRITION
FOOD SECURITY AND LIVELIHOODS

EDUCATION IN EMERGENCIES

CONTEXT

 

Jordan hosts 665,884 registered Syrian refugees, that is the equivalent of 7% of the Jordanian population. 83% of refugees live in hosting communities, while the remaining refugees live in 3 official refugee camps Zaatari (77,258 people), Azraq (36,874 people), and in the Emirati-Jordanian Camp (EJC) (6,537 people). Although the border between Jordan and Syria was opened in October 2018, 90% of refugees do not consider it to be safe to return to Syria. Almost 11 years after the start of the crisis, the Syrian refugees living in the urban areas remain extremely vulnerable because they do not benefit from legal protection, they do not have access to sustainable sources of
income, especially considering limitations to access to jobs in the formal economy. Such economic vulnerability hinders refugees’ ability to meet their basic needs and access services such as education and health, leading to the adoption of negative coping strategies, such as buying food on credit, accepting exploitative, high-risk, or illegal temporary jobs, and reducing non-food expenditures. Moreover, there is a strong correlation between taking children out of school, child marriage and child labour.

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