Italy | INTERSOS

ITALY

INTERSOS INTERVENTION

In 2011, in Rome, we established A28, our night centre which has hosted more than 4,000 unaccompanied minors in transit to northern Europe. This project ran its course, and in 2017 it transformed itself into a new project that continues its legacy while amplifying its scope and objectives: the new INTERSOS24 centre.

INTERSOS24 opened its doors in October 2017 and hosts 3 project levels: the continuation of A28 with the protection of MSNAs in transit in Italy, as well as mothers and foreign women in situations of serious need; a daytime section of social activities with the local territory and with the vulnerable Italian and foreign resident population, for training and education activities; a free Social Clinic open to the public starting in 2018 with INTERSOS doctors, psychologists and volunteers of “Medici Sulla Strada” [Doctors on the Streets].

In 2014, in Crotone we opened the first INTERSOS polyclinic, which offers medical assistance, social services and psychological support to migrants, asylum seekers and Italians living in poverty. We also provide medical assistance to guests from several centres. Today the centre has been included in a FAMI project (Fondo Asilo, Migrazione e Integrazione – Asylum, Migration and Integration Fund) managed by the ASP (Provincial Health Authority) of Crotone, which replicates its impact on the territory, including and integrating into the local health system the important component of psychological support. The project is approaching its end (March 2018) with the final handover of the service to the Provincial Health Authority.

In 2017, we expanded the project, which was launched in 2016 in collaboration with UNICEF to provide assistance to unaccompanied minors on a national scale. It began with relief operations in the Central Mediterranean on board the Italian Coast Guard units, and continues with an extensive monitoring and improvement of standards in the reception centres all over Sicily, in the provinces of Palermo, Trapani, Agrigento, Messina, Catania and Siracusa in particular. Furthermore, the project assists the MSNAs in Italy at the main hub and transit points of their informal migratory flow. In Rome, it does so with a mobile team that has been active for years, and in Ventimiglia and Como it provides a constant support presence.

HIGHLIGHTS

1.480

MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS CARRIED OUT WITH THE MOBILE CLINIC IN VENTIMIGLIA (2017)

794

FIRST MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS CARRIED OUT AT THE SOCIAL CLINIC IN CROTONE (2017)

2.648

MSNAS ASSISTED IN THE TRANSIT SITES IN VENTIMIGLIA AND COMO (2017)

347

MSNAS HOSTED IN ROME AT THE A28 CENTRE BETWEEN JANUARY AND SEPTEMBER AND 47 HOSTED AT THE INTERSOS24 CENTRE BETWEEN OCTOBER AND DECEMBER (2017)

475

RECEPTION CENTRE OPERATORS AND 20 TRAINED VOLUNTEER TUTORS (2017)

2.764

MSNAS AND 1.242 WOMEN ASSISTED ON THE ITALIAN COAST GUARD SHIPS IN RESCUE OPERATIONS (2017)

1.612

MSNAS ASSISTED IN 142 RECEPTION CENTRES IN WESTERN SICILY (2017)

12.000

ASSISTED PERSONS (2017)

10

NUMBER OF PROJECTS (2017)

CONTEXT

More than 60 million people in the world are forced to flee their homes due to wars, violence and climate change. Over the course of 2017, over 119,000 people reached Italy via the Mediterranean Sea. In 2017, more than 3,190 people lost their lives during the crossing. The migratory flow increased until the middle of 2017, undergoing a drastic reduction in the summer and autumn months, which continues in the early months of 2018. However, this does not seem to be due to a sudden dignified resolution of the problems that cause and exploit the Central Mediterranean route. Instead it appears to be caused by an attempt by the European Union to outsource the border control at any cost.

With the growing economic crisis and the intensification of migratory flows, the migrants and refugees seeking asylum in Italy are subjected to extreme poverty and social exclusion. The social and health conditions in which this large number of migrants and asylum seekers live is mostly precarious. This situation burdens the local social and health system, which does not always respond adequately to what has become a real emergency.

Of the 17,000 foreign minors who arrived in Italy in 2017, more than 15,000 were unaccompanied (MSNA) children fleeing conflict, persecution or forced enlistment. Many of them want to reach northern European countries and therefore remain invisible to the authorities to avoid identification. This exposes them to exploitation and abuse.

READ ALSO

Migration unit: Intersos Annual Report 2017

In 2011 the number of migrants and refugees that arrived to Europe was growing at a high rate, as a consequence of the instability caused by the Arab Spring. For this reason, INTERSOS started the Migration Unit, which is part of its organizational structure, and is...

read more